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If you cut Spurgeon, he’d bleed the Bible. More and more people are hearing about Charles Spurgeon – the 19th Century preacher from London. And it’s for good reasons that people are hearing about him, for his life of faith is extremely encouraging. That’s why we’re specifically looking at Spurgeon’s life this week – and even his young adulthood. We want to know what he did and thought. We also want to hear what he’d say to us if he were to peer into our culture today. We’re graciously joined by Dr. Christian George to help us with this.


 

Who’s Our Guest?

Dr. Christian George serves as assistant professor of historical theology and curator of the Spurgeon Library at The Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. George has authored several books, including Sacred Travels, Sex, Sushi, & Salvation and GodologyChristian and his wife, Rebecca, live in Kansas City.


Episode Links

You should definitely check out the first two volumes of The Lost Sermons of C.H. Spurgeon from Christian.

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Also, the site that Christian was talking about with all the Spurgeon resources on it is simply spurgeon.org.

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Read It

*Below is an edited transcription of the audio conversation.

evangelism

With me today is Dr. Christian George. Christian is an author and a professor. He actually serves as assistant professor of historical theology, and he’s curator of the Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. Thanks so much for being here today, Christian.

head

Thanks, Isaac.

evangelism

Before we kind of look into the life of Charles Spurgeon, why don’t you first just tell us a bit about who you are. Just a little bit personal, maybe something interesting about you. Then also, what you do day by day.

head

Absolutely. I’m 35 years old. I was born in 1981 in Louisville, Kentucky. My dad was a professor at Southern Seminary, way back in the day. I grew up in a Christian home, Christian family. When I was eight years old, Isaac, I really felt God pulling me to Himself. I still remember what that feels like, just this burning and yearning for Christ.

Over the course of high school and college I just fell in love with the Saviour in a million ways. I went to Stanford University. I was an art major there, so drawing portraits all day. Then God pulled me into the ministry, just full force. I started preaching, and eventually that led into a passion for Charles Spurgeon, this great prince of preachers as they call him.

I did my MDiv at Beeson Divinity School, and then I went over to Scotland. My wife and I basically sold everything we’ve ever owned. We sold our car and we went to north Scotland for three very cold but blessed years. Then after that I was hired at OBU, Oklahoma Baptist University in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Then three years later I was asked to come curate the Spurgeon library in Kansas City where I’m currently going on my fourth year.

evangelism

That’s awesome. That’s so good. You say that you started to get interested in who Spurgeon was. Was there something, an event or something you read, that really just captured your mind at first when it came to Spurgeon?

head

Well, you know, he has this little devotional called “Morning and Evening”. It’s just a very simple devotional, a morning message and an evening message.

I went to England with my father. He took me to all the great places where Spurgeon lived. The combination of those two things, traveling to see where Spurgeon preached and then reading. It just was amazing.

I fell in love with Spurgeon.

evangelism

That’s awesome. That’s so good. The majority of this conversation is really maybe not a conversation, because I just want to hear from you. I really just want to give the next little good chunk of time in our short conversation, I guess, just to hear a basic life story of Charles Spurgeon.

If someone’s never heard of this prince of preachers, as you say, who was he and what did he do?

head

A lot of people have never heard the name Charles Spurgeon. We’re trying to change that at the library, for sure.

He was born in 1834. In fact, if you’ve ever watched “Downtown Abbey”, I don’t know if you watch that show, but Maggie, the older duchess, she would have been a little girl. She could have heard Spurgeon preach. That’s kind of the time frame we’re working in.

He was a mega church pastor before mega churches were ever popular. He was converted as a teenager at the age of 16. He fell in love with Christ. He starts preaching the gospel in the middle of nowhere. He’s a teenager preaching in this little country church. It swells from about 30 people to almost 450 people in three years.

Then of course London gets word that there’s this young preacher and he’s energetic and he’s on fire for Christ. They invite him to London. Really, at the age of 19 and 20, he goes viral.

He was the most popular person of his day by 22, 23.

Eventually he published more sermons in English, more words in English, than any Christian in history. He founded 66 ministries, like an orphanage. He just loved people.

evangelism

I was going to say, when you say he went viral, for a lot of us, when we think viral, we think a 20 second clip on YouTube or Facebook. What does viral look like back then?

head

There was no Facebook in the Victorian era, for sure. There was the printing press. All these sermons circulated around the world. People in San Francisco and Colorado were reading Spurgeon’s sermons. Everybody wanted to hear him preach. Mark Twain, he goes to the Tabernacle and hears Spurgeon preach. The 20th president of the United States goes to London, John D. Rockefeller.

Really, anyone who is anyone in Spurgeon’s day would have wanted to go hear the gospel preached from the lips of this kid.

evangelism

That’s amazing. Yeah. His whole life then was just devoted to being a pastor and preacher, correct?

head

You know, he burned all of his calories preaching, pastoring, but you know what? A lot of people don’t know this. He was worth somewhere around 100 million pounds, like $100 million. Yet, he died poor because he personally funneled most of his money into starting 66 ministries.

He incarnated the gospel in a way that his world needed.

evangelism

Right. Yeah. That’s really good. Obviously when someone hears this they think, okay, here he is, in a sense, in this light of perfection, in a sense. Could you shed light on some of his areas of maybe struggle?

head

Absolutely. It’s very easy to think he’s bulletproof. “There’s nothing that can hurt Spurgeon.”

Listen, man, he could bleed. He could bleed like all of us.

He suffered from depression, maybe bipolarity. He’s always up and down. He almost took his life once, early in his teenage years, just because he was wrestling with guilt and sin. I really like his early teenage years probably the best, because here’s this young man, he’s wrestling with pride – he called it his “darling sin.” He tried to get rid of it. I think that’s true for many of us today.

evangelism

Yeah. That’s true. That’s good. You kind of mentioned it a little bit there. Do we know anything quite specific about his teenage young adult years? Does he write about that?

head

Yeah. He has an autobiography. We know a lot about his young teenage years. He was raised by his grandfather because his parents were so poor they couldn’t even take care of him. He’s wrestling, Isaac. He’s wrestling with,

“What do I do with my life? Where am I going to throw my weight?”

Speaking of weight, he was 5’4″, about 300 pounds, so he had some weight, certainly, to throw. The Lord pulled him into the ministry of preaching and pastoring and shepherding people as such a young teenager.

Just imagine, this 17-year-old preaching with fire and oxygen and grace. It really changed early Cambridge and it eventually changed the world.

evangelism

Yeah. You have written, or you’re in the process of writing a book on the lost sermons of Spurgeon, correct?

head

Yes. It’s going to be 12 volumes. Volume one came out last year. Volume two’s about to come out, I think next week actually. These are his early teenage sermons. When I was in London, I discovered the stack of notebooks and just felt God calling me to publish these for his glory. We’ve been busy, man, burning our calories, but God’s been faithful and He’s helping us.

evangelism

That’s so good. It’s interesting. You obviously have been formally in the ministry for a while now and all of that kind of stuff. When you look at these sermons that Spurgeon wrote when he was under 20-years-old compared to the sermons that he wrote when he was older, do you see lots of difference in theology changing? How does that kind of look when you look at his young adult sermons?

head

His theology basically remains the same from the beginning to the end, but the way he preached – he comes out of the gate swinging.

He said “As preachers, we don’t go snowballing on Sunday. We’re tossing grenades at the enemy.”

So here’s this young grenade-tossing preacher. It’s amazing. One sermon particularly, in Volume one, Sermon 14, changed my life. Several years ago I was very sick. I almost passed away from a ruptured appendix. Twelve months, man, of surgeries and just pain and recovery. There was one line from Sermon 14, “God’s grace given to us”, that I just kept turning over in my mind. It really brought me back from the dead. It says this:

Spurgeon said, “Think much on grace, Christian. Think much on grace.”

That was one line. I think very often God doesn’t use a whole book to change someone’s life, just a single, simple sentence. That one certainly did mine.

evangelism

That’s awesome. It kind of plays on the double meaning, too, because your name, obviously, and the fact of who you are. That’s actually awesome.

Christian, I wanted to kind of do this for fun, and I wanted to give you some historical liberty here. As a church historian, really, maybe you love to hear that you get to take some historical liberty here. You can have that.

Could you imagine some things that Spurgeon may have been up to at various times in his young adult life? The reason I ask this is just to paint a picture of his devotion, of his activities, things like that. Okay. Let’s try this. What do you think, let’s say, at 7 a.m. on a Tuesday?

head

7 a.m. on a Tuesday, Spurgeon would have been up already several hours. He once said, “I wish it could be said of us that we wasted neither an hour of our time nor an hour of other people’s time.” The kid got up early. He preached 12 times a week, man.

evangelism

12 times a week?

head

A different sermon every time in his early life. He’s burning his calories for Christ. He’s not Netflixing his day away.

evangelism

Right. No, I understand that. Okay. Christian, help us out here, though. The thought of 12 sermons a week and each one a different sermon. Does he get any sleep? Does he hang out? Does he have friends that he sees?

head

Yeah, he does have friends, most certainly, but most of the time in his very young life, when everybody else was playing outside, he was reading books. He was reading John Bunyan. I think it’s a reminder for us that

the past has something to tell the present about how to go into the future.

Spurgeon pulled the momentum from the past and the wisdom. He often found himself in the library reading books. Absolutely.

evangelism

Yeah. No. That’s really cool. Just as a side note, too. When I’ve read Spurgeon or I’ve read about Spurgeon, something, and maybe you can spread light on this, here’s this just mammoth preacher and theologian preaching these incredible truths. At the same time, it’s not like he’s sort of just all “head knowledge,” sort of murmuring intellectual sentences. You can really see this intense fire and passion and almost a charisma that comes out of him.

head

Yes. It’s so intimate. Absolutely, man. You read his works. Even right now, if you picked up “Morning and Evening” this morning, man, you’d read his works, and it’s like he’s sitting right next to you whispering the gospel in your ear.

He loses very little over time. That’s probably one reason he’s the most tweeted dead person on the internet, you know what I mean? At least as far as the Christian world goes.

Don’t forget, he had a photographic memory. He never forgot anything. That probably helped him with those 12 sermons a week, I imagine.

evangelism

I bet. I bet. You know, it’s interesting, just to kind of continue this thought. When I look around at the sort of general Christian landscape, especially North America, it seems like there’s this attitude, and this is very general. I’m not making any statements.

It seems like there’s this general idea where, in order to be kind of passionate and charismatic and all these things, you sort of have to throw away some of the hard doctrines and all that kind of stuff, because that’s just for the academics. We need to be passionate and go out there. What we see in Spurgeon, which I find so fascinating, is that Spurgeon sort of really helps model the life of both. There’s this intense theology and he was a book worm and everything like that. At the same time, he was able to preach with such charisma.

head

Yeah. He didn’t cut corners when it comes to his theological convictions. In fact, the gospel has an edge to it, Isaac. You start sandpapering that edge off and buffing it out and waxing it up, you lose the cutting ability of the Word that Christ then comes in and heals. No, Spurgeon never compromised on that. Yet, he preached for souls, man. His best book is called “The Soul Winner”. That’s what he was.

evangelism

That’s awesome. That’s so good. All right. 8 p.m. on a Friday. What would young adult Spurgeon be doing?

head