• indoubt Podcast
  • ·
  • May 13, 2024

Ep. 67: The RAPTURE Debate and END TIMES Theology w/ Brent Smith

With Brent Smith, , , and Andrew Marcus

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There are so many questions when it comes to eschatology and our views on the end times. It is important to study and be aware of today’s climate in the spiritual world and the glorious hope we have awaiting for us as followers of Christ. Are we currently in the end times? Is there a such thing as a rapture? When will it happen? What are the different end times theologies and why are there different viewpoints? Join host Andrew Marcus as he spends time with Pastor Brent Smith from Riverside Calvary Chapel where they dive deep into the Rapture, the book of Revelation and our blessed hope that awaits us in Christ!

View Transcription

Andrew Marcus:

Hey, this is Andrew Marcus from THE INDOUBT SHOW. We got an awesome program today. Something that I’ve been excited to dive into. We are talking about end times with Brent Smith from Riverside Calvary Chapel, and we’re going to dive into the different theologies, eschatology, premillennial, postmillennial, amillennial. Just good information to have. We should be thinking of Christ’s return and being excited about it and hopeful for the future. And so we hope you enjoy this week’s program as we take a deep dive on the end times. God bless.

All right, well, today we have Brent Smith in the house. How’s it going, man?

Brent Smith:

Hey. Doing awesome. Great to be here.

Andrew Marcus:

We want to talk about eschatology and I want to go through some basic definitions as we go through because I feel like a lot of people, even when we did THE INDOUBT SHOW live at Apologetics, sometimes Dr. John will say all these crazy big words and people are just like, “Oh, I don’t know what that means.”

Brent Smith:

Sure.

Andrew Marcus:

Is there a definition of eschatology or is it just end times?

Brent Smith:

Eschatology means the study of last days, last things, and it’s taken from the word eschatos, which means last or final, and then -ology or logos, the study of, so it’s a study of last things, right? That’s what we’re talking about.

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah.

Brent Smith:

It’s a favorite subject of mine. Love it.

Andrew Marcus:

Is it actually?

Brent Smith:

Right there up with Nacho Libre. It’s right there.

Andrew Marcus:

Well, yeah, it’s like Nacho Libre. End times.

Brent Smith:

End times, yeah.

Andrew Marcus:

Well, because Jesus is coming back so it should be something that we’re all thinking about.

Brent Smith:

Yeah.

Andrew Marcus:

And we’re all excited about. Now obviously there’s different camps of what different people believe, and so I’d love to walk through the different camps, the different viewpoints, maybe even some of the passages of where they would get that from.

Brent Smith:

Yeah.

Andrew Marcus:

And again, we don’t want to cause division or cause controversy. We just want to understand.

Brent Smith:

Sure.

Andrew Marcus:

Because I think it’s important to land somewhere.

Brent Smith:

Yeah.

Andrew Marcus:

And have good biblical foundation because at the end of the day, if someone is one and another person is another, if you love Jesus and you declare him as Lord and Savior, well, I’ll see you in heaven. Oh, I was wrong. I’ll buy you a coffee.

Brent Smith:

Exactly.

Andrew Marcus:

But okay, so eschatology is just studying of the end things, like the last days, the last things.

Brent Smith:

Yeah. What’s amazing is that the Bible is so much prophecy. It’s like people argue whether it’s a third or quarter, but there’s a significant amount of the Bible that’s prophetic in nature, right?

Andrew Marcus:

Yep.

Brent Smith:

And with that, I mean that’s to produce a lot of good things. What prophecy does and when you see prophecy and fulfilled prophecy, well, it proves that God is true, that the Bible is truth. I think it really excites people into evangelism, to share the good news, to know that the Lord is coming back again.

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah.

Brent Smith:

It causes us to live in greater holiness. I think in 1st John 3:2 and 3 talks about when we see Jesus, we’re going see him as he is. We’re going to be like him. And all those that have that hope and purify him as he is pure. And so it does all these things and it’s our blessed hope. Titus talks about this being our blessed hope that we have of seeing our great God and Savior Jesus Christ. So we know he’s coming back. So like you said, I mean, these are all things that we want to be careful that we don’t divide over these things. These are secondary issues in the church.

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah. Yeah.

Brent Smith:

These are fun things to talk about. Like I say, it’s fun to talk about prophecy and end times things, but they’re secondary issues.

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah.

Brent Smith:

And we want to be careful that we don’t argue or become divisive over these things, but we can talk about it and share the different views that there are.

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah, it’s so important because I feel like a lot of people say, “Hey, we should talk about these things.” And then when they talk about it, all of a sudden everyone divides and they go, but you told us that we should.

Brent Smith:

Yeah.

Andrew Marcus:

But you believe that though? It’s like, okay. So let’s just be grown adults and unpack and just learn and grow and think about these things because you know what? The world has so much hopelessness.

Brent Smith:

Oh, yeah.

Andrew Marcus:

And so when we study end times, it’s not so it’s doom and gloom and we’re afraid and it’s overwhelming. It’s no. This great hope and this blessed assurance. Yesterday my boy was talking about, he just asked like, “Daddy, when is Jesus coming back?” And I said, “The Bible talks about it in Corinthians, like a twinkle of an eye.”

Brent Smith:

Yeah.

Andrew Marcus:

And so then the whole day he’s just walking around.

Brent Smith:

He’s blinking. Can it be now?

Andrew Marcus:

I’m like, yes, that’s how we need to be living. But it’s like this great excitement and this blessed hope. So you mentioned prophecy and I do want to talk about prophecy, but Chris and I were talking a few weeks ago about prophecy and how sometimes that rubs people the wrong way.

Brent Smith:

Sure.

Andrew Marcus:

How do we avoid feeling that way because sometimes a lot of people say, “Oh, Jesus is coming on March 18, 1988, and…

Brent Smith:

Oh, yeah.

Andrew Marcus:

Doesn’t happen. And so how do we have a good balance? Because prophecy is, we see a lot of… Like I said, the Bible is filled with a lot of prophecy, so it’s not like it’s a bad thing, but sometimes that word gets dragged in the mud a little bit.

Brent Smith:

Well, it does, and what’s interesting is that we’re seeing certain people, maybe churches or denominations that are really trying to downplay prophecy and kind of make it a taboo thing. This isn’t something we should be talking about. There’s more pertinent things. And some people think that if we’re just talking about prophecy, all that is is kind of escapism for Christians. We’re just looking to get out of here when there’s a lot of stuff to do while we are here. And so sometimes people see those with that kind of excitement for prophecy, it’s just like we just are looking to be with Jesus and we want to just escape this world.

And there’s certainly truth to that to some degree, but we want to be certain that it’s not causing us to be so heavenly minded that we’re no earthly good. I think if we’re not heavenly minded, we’re not going to be any earthly good. And so our desire is that we have that blessed hope, but that certainly is to propel us and motivate us now to say I want this life to count all the more in this world, not only for my appearance before Jesus, but to see others come to know Jesus. I want to make a difference in this world now. And so it is to excite us. It’s to motivate us on to living that life that’s going to really count. So it does get kind of maybe downplayed because we do see some people that get a little bit maybe over-fanatic about these things.

Andrew Marcus:

Kind of conspiracy-ish.

Brent Smith:

Conspiracy-ish. And they really sometimes can give Christianity a bad name by their fanaticism towards these things. But that’s never the intent. That’s never obviously what we’re talking about when we’re talking about prophesy and the coming of the Lord. It’s certainly to be a blessed hope and excitement, but to cause us now to live differently. I think when we see those people out there that are setting dates, and certainly we know that Jesus said no man knows the day or the hour. So as soon as somebody sets a date, oh, this is when this is going to happen.

Andrew Marcus:

It’s for sure not coming.

Brent Smith:

You mark it on the calendar. This is not when it’s happening, It’s not going to be it. But there’s people again, that are setting dates. And then what happens with that is that people maybe see these things being said or they grow up where all the emphasis is simply just on, well, the Lord’s coming back and we’re just holding on. And as things continue on, people begin to get a little bit maybe complacent or disillusioned, thinking, well, I’ve been told this. This is going to happen. It’s not. And so now they begin to just kind of reject everything as a whole to the point where it’s not sometimes just rejecting anything of a prophetic nature, but it’s just almost rejecting Christianity.

They’ve been just disillusioned. They’ve been told one thing, it doesn’t happen. And so now they’re just giving up. And Peter talks about that in 2nd Peter 3, where he says, people are saying, where’s this coming of the Lord? And things just continuing on as normal, and you’re going to see that kind of scoffing I believe, in the days leading up to the Lord’s return. And I think that’s something we are seeing that we need to guard ourselves from that. We’re not scoffing over these things, but we are having an excitement and a joy that’s causing us to live all the more for Christ and to make the difference in our world.

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah, it’s so good, man. It’s so good. And I think even when you talk about how a big chunk of the Bible is filled with prophecy, so prophecy is not bad, it’s just we get a little carried away sometimes and we kind of get in this thing. So it’s just having a healthy balance.

Brent Smith:

Exactly.

Andrew Marcus:

And pointing to the great hope, but not focusing on it so much that we’re useless when we’re here.

Brent Smith:

Yeah, that’s right.

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah, that’s good. That’s a good word. Okay, so there’s three camps.

Brent Smith:

Yeah.

Andrew Marcus:

There’s premillennial, postmillennial and amillennial.

Brent Smith:

Yeah. Those are the three main camps that we have.

Andrew Marcus:

Main camps, and then there’s panmillennial, those who say, you know what? We’ll see you when we get there.

Brent Smith:

It’s all going to just pan out. It’s whatever happens, happens.

Andrew Marcus:

Yep.

Brent Smith:

For sure.

Andrew Marcus:

So let’s walk through the different ones. So let’s start with premillennial.

Brent Smith:

Okay. All right. So the main view with premillennial is… So when we’re talking about the millennium, right, we’re talking about…

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah, maybe unpack that first.

Brent Smith:

Let’s talk about what the millennium is.

Andrew Marcus:

Yes, because everyone’s like, well, I’m a millennial, and that was the joke, millennials.

Brent Smith:

Nice.

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah. So let’s unpack what is the millennium and why did we talk about it. Where does it come from?

Brent Smith:

So it comes from a Latin word, which means a thousand years. So that’s what we’re dealing with. We’re dealing with…

Andrew Marcus:

And some people think it’s literal and some people think it’s a long period of time.

Brent Smith:

Yeah. And that’s why we have these three different camps is because of the difference of interpretation of scripture. So we’ll unpack that a little bit here, but that term millennium just simply means a thousand years. And what we oftentimes refer to as the millennium is this reign of Christ, a thousand-year reign of Christ, which some will take literally and some will take more figuratively or allegorically. And that comes from Revelation 20, and it talks about that reign of Christ and it’s mentioned six times in Revelation 20 just in the first few verses, a term of a thousand years. So that description is given, and so many will take that literally, and some will say, “Well, it’s not.”

So premillennials they believe that Jesus Christ is going to come back at a second coming, and then he’s going to establish this millennial reign of Christ where Jesus is going to be physically on the earth and the earth is going to be renewed, restored. This is the time where many of the Old Testament promises, where the prophets were speaking about a future time, this is when a lot of those are going to be fulfilled, is in the millennium where there’s going to be this peace and righteousness. It’ll be a reign of peace and righteousness and Christ is going to be the center of it all. So premillennials will believe that Christ comes back literally and physically to this world and then establishes this reign of Christ for a thousand years. So that’s the general premillennial view.

Andrew Marcus:

And then there’s historic premillennial?

Brent Smith:

Yeah. Historic premillennial and dispensational premillennial. Historical premillennial simply believes that Christ is going to come back after the tribulation period. So it’s after the tribulation period. The church goes through the tribulation, Christ comes back and then enters into the millennial reign. And then dispensational premillennial is the belief that the church is going to be raptured up, which we’ll maybe get into later on. Church is going to be raptured up and not go through the tribulation period and then Christ comes back. So they’re very similar except for the place of the church during that tribulation period, what leads up to Christ’s second coming.

Andrew Marcus:

So some people say the church will be gone, some people say the church will go through…

Brent Smith:

Tribulation, yeah.

Andrew Marcus:

Tribulation.

Brent Smith:

And then the second coming and then the millennial reign of Christ. So that’s the premillennial view.

Andrew Marcus:

Very interesting.

Brent Smith:

Let’s get into the two camps here, postmillennial because postmillennial and amillennial kind of have that view where we’re in the millennium right now.

Andrew Marcus:

Right now.

Brent Smith:

And so they take a lot of those scriptures very figuratively. The Book of Revelation becomes very allegorical. It’s not to be interpreted literally in a sense. So the post-tribulation view believes that the reign of Christ is happening right now through believers and as the gospel is going forth, that’s establishing this reign of Christ here on earth right now. And so what post-tribulationists believe is that the church is really just going to usher in this golden era of the reign of Christ here on earth right now, and that the world is going to get better, the world’s going to become more Christian, that Christians are to really occupy the different spheres of influence in the world. And we just really usher in the kingdom of God right now, the millennium, and then Christ comes back and just sort of inherits it, and then it moves into the eternal state, which is just eternal, new heaven, new earth. When we talk about the eternal state, we’re talking about when Christ comes and just again, new heaven, new earth.

Andrew Marcus:

So we’re building the new heaven and new earth right now.

Brent Smith:

We’re building the kingdom of God. So I think you could equate the kingdom of God to the millennium.

Andrew Marcus:

Right.

Brent Smith:

Because those terms get used interchangeably, right?

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah.

Brent Smith:

Kingdom of God, the reign of Christ here on earth, the millennium. And so postmillennialists will believe that we’re establishing that kingdom right now on earth. That’s the reign of Christ happening through the lives of believers. And as we share the gospel, the world just continues to become more Christianized. So what happened was… That was a very popular view and that began to lose a little bit of steam when we see the conditions of the world and we see that, “Oh, man. The church is really maybe not doing a great job of Christianizing the world.” Maybe it’s not going the way that was expected to happen because certainly the gospel is advancing and we’re seeing great things happening in and through the church. Don’t want to disparage that by any means. But certainly we don’t see the world becoming more Christian.

Andrew Marcus:

But more people are getting saved.

Brent Smith:

Yes.

Andrew Marcus:

So maybe that’s where they’re hoping as more people get saved things will… Was it a big like during Jesus revolution, those moments in history, or was it even before that? When was this big?

Brent Smith:

Even before that.

Andrew Marcus:

Before that.

Brent Smith:

Even before that. And so amillennialism now. Now amillennium, just simply means with ‘a’ in front of it, it means no millennium. And that’s kind of a misnomer because it’s not that amillennials don’t believe in a millennial reign of Christ, but that term kind of essentially becomes known as no millennium, meaning that there’s not going to be a literal millennial reign of Christ. So amillennials kind of take certain views of the posttribulationists in that it’s figurative reign of Christ. And that really began, that reign of Christ and this kingdom era is a spiritual reign of Christ. And that really began at Christ’s death and resurrection. He defeated Satan there on the cross, and as he rose again, established now this reign of Christ, which is a spiritual reign in the hearts of people.

But they don’t believe that this is going to be a world that’s going to get better. They just simply mean that Christ is reigning right now in and through the hearts, that he’s established the kingdom of God and his reign in the hearts of the followers of Jesus. So it’s not a literal reign of Christ, but that Christ is truly reigning right now from heaven and in and through the church.

Andrew Marcus:

That’s really interesting because there’s obviously big theologians that we would love and trust who are all over the map.

Brent Smith:

Yeah, yeah.

Andrew Marcus:

So again, it’s not like we’re trying to be divisive or whatever. It’s like wherever you land, you land.

Brent Smith:

So amillennialism really began with Origen, and then Augustine really took that and made that very popular. And so amillennialism is the position that the majority of the Roman Catholic Church takes, that Eastern Orthodox Church takes, that many Protestant churches and reformers take, like Calvin and Luther hold that view of amillennialism. So it’s a very popular view within the church today. Absolutely.

Andrew Marcus:

And when we talk about millennium, we talk about the fact that Satan is bound up for those thousand years?

Brent Smith:

Yep.

Andrew Marcus:

So that would be hard to wrap my head around that because I feel like I just look at the news or look outside my window and I realize, “Oh, I don’t…”

Brent Smith:

Doesn’t really seem like that’s happening. Yeah. So with that, definitely that’s where… Let me unpack that a little bit because Revelation 20, when you read that again, when you see that term a thousand years, so with a postmillennial and an amillennial view…

Andrew Marcus:

Wordative?

Brent Smith:

We’ve definitely gone past a thousand years. So they don’t view that this is a literal thousand years because if this really commenced, this reign of Christ at his resurrection, well, we’ve been 2,000 years in the making of this. Postmillennials would say, yeah, we’ve kind of gone past that. It’s not a literal thousand years. But then you see that six times mentioned in Revelation 20. So premillennials hold that literal view that would God truly say it’s a thousand years if it’s not just some kind of time period in history that’s to come where it’s going to be a reign of Christ. He seems very specific in that term, a thousand years.

So it says in Revelation 20:1 and 3, that Satan is indeed going to be bound and he’s going to be placed in the bottomless pit where he’s not going to have any influence any longer. So premillennials would believe that’s why we have this reign of Christ on the earth and it’s the reign of peace and righteousness. It’s when we see all these promises fulfilled because Satan is no longer influencing anybody. And so there’s going to be just this perfect atmosphere, this perfect environment of people that are following the Lord Jesus and walking according to his word.

Now, postmillennials would say that Satan is bound figuratively, and he’s bound whenever the gospel goes forth because that’s the focus now. It’s the advancement of the gospel in the world, and that’s seeing the kingdom of God, the millennium really coming into play. So Satan is bound whenever the gospel goes forth and it just continues on until there’s just really no influence of Satan any longer. Now amillennialists would say that again, Satan is basically defeated there on the cross.

Andrew Marcus:

On the cross, yeah.

Brent Smith:

That Christ’s reign in the hearts of people, Satan cannot stop that. So Satan is bound in the sense that Jesus is going to save those that he calls to be saved. And so they will just really look at that again, Satan being bound in a figurative sense, a spiritual sense that he’s bound. He still has influence in the world, but he can do nothing against those that Jesus saves.

Andrew Marcus:

So it really comes down to a figurative and literal interpretation.

Brent Smith:

Yeah, exactly. And that’s where we get these different camps and these different views and where we can see a lot of variance within scripture in the sense of how you interpret scripture. One person is saying one thing about a passage. We were talking earlier about a scenario in John where one interpretation comes forth that seems so different than traditional views, but it’s in different interpretation. So I personally, I love to interpret the Bible very literally unless it shows otherwise. And it’s to be taken literally when it’s shown not to be. And there are certainly pictures that are being given. There’s allegory. The book of Revelation…

Andrew Marcus:

There’s different styles of literature.

Brent Smith:

Different styles of writing. And in the book of Revelation, certainly there are a lot of pictures that are being presented. But John is being shown, I believe John is literally being shown a vision of what is to come. Because John is told right in Revelation 1:19, “Write the things which you has seen, the things which are, and the things which will take place after this.” So he’s writing about things that he’s seeing that he probably can have no idea how to express that. It’s something he’s never seen before, future things. So there are pictures that John is trying to describe in his own way of communicating that what he knows, but what the deal is that they’re not just allegories. They have a literal fulfillment to them. There’s a literalness to them, but it may not be as he sees locusts or these demons with face of a horse, all these things, stinging men.

He’s trying to describe these things that he may have no idea how to describe that in his own language. So he’s giving pictures of it. So it’s not that you just dismiss that as being some kind of spiritual or allegorical sense. You go, well, that has a literalness to it. It may not be that it’s the face of a horse that we’re going to see in those future times, but there’s a literalness to it that there’s going to be something that’s going to come against those people that are in that time period that’s going to bring sting, that’s going to really come against those and hurt those people. And what that is, is to be seen.

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah. I feel a lot of people are afraid to read Revelation.

Brent Smith:

Sure.

Andrew Marcus:

And maybe it’s overwhelming or it’s hard to understand or the whole figurative literal, like where do I land. How would you encourage a young person to dive into Revelation? Because I feel like for me, I wake up every morning. I open my blinds and say what chapter of Revelation are we doing today? I just feel like we’re coming close, man.

Brent Smith:

Well, let me give you a breakdown. And again, this is going to be my bias, my interpretation of Revelation, and again, probably communicating my view as to where I stand in premillennialism.

Andrew Marcus:

You’re a panmillennialist for sure. You know what, man? I’ll see you when we get there.

Brent Smith:

It’s all going to come together.

Andrew Marcus:

In a sense that’s true.

Brent Smith:

And we have people in our church that hold different views, and I don’t sit there. And I say, it’s okay to be wrong. You can hold your view, but…

Andrew Marcus:

But I’m right.

Brent Smith:

And I’ll show you when we all arrive.

Andrew Marcus:

Yeah, like I told you, I’m here first.

Brent Smith:

Here we are.

Andrew Marcus:

Judgment’s going to happen now. Sucker.

Brent Smith:

It’s all good. You know what? We want to hold those things lightly. We don’t want to be divisive, all those things. So here’s what’s really been helpful to me in Revelation, and I just kind of shared with you what John was told to write and Revelation 1:19 says, “Write the things which you’ve seen, the things which are, and the things which will take place after this.” So to break down Revelation, it’s really a very simple book to break down when you look at that kind of built-in outline that’s right there for us. Because the things which you has seen is chapter one, and John is given that Revelation of Jesus and not crucified Jesus, resurrected, conquering King Jesus, the one that’s coming back to reclaim all that’s his.

So John’s given a vision in chapter one of Jesus, who he is, and then he’s told write the things which are. And then what does chapters two and three go through? The church, the seven churches of Asia, which I believe are literal churches in that time that John is writing to, but it seems like it has an even greater view of the church age, right from the beginning church to the last church, the Laodicean church, the lukewarm church, which seems to be…

Andrew Marcus:

Oh my goodness.

Brent Smith:

Where some are at today. So you see this progression through church history of those seven churches. So the things which are. And then write the things which will take place after this. After what? After what he’s just seen, the churches. In Revelation 4, John is told, Hey, John, come on up here and I’m going to show you things which will take place after this. That seems to me like a picture, a type of the rapture. John is taken up to heaven before this tribulation period unfolds in chapters 6 to 19. Chapters 4 and 5 are John in heaven. What’s going on, the rapture. And chapters 6 to 19 is the unfolding of the tribulation period.

And there’s no mention of the church in chapters 6 to 19. That’s why I believe that the church is not here during the tribulation. And we can talk more about that later on. So you see these different judgments that are coming down. That’s why I believe the church isn’t here because it’s God’s judgment upon a Christ-rejecting world during the tribulation period. And the church isn’t present. 1st Thessalonians 5:9 says “That God has not appointed us under wrath, but to obtain salvation through our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.” So the church is in heaven, and the tribulation unfolds. Chapter 6 to 19 is the tribulation. Then chapter 19 is the second coming of Christ. Revelation 20 moves into the millennial reign of Christ. In chapter 21, the new heaven, new earth unfolding.

So when you begin to break it down by this kind of chronological timeline, then I think you can easily fit into the Book of Revelation based on that built-in timeline and outline of Revelation 1:19. It begins to make a lot of sense. Now, yes, you’re going to be reading it and you’re going to see different pictures being given that sometimes go, well, what is that exactly? But again, don’t get caught up in the details, but get an understanding of what’s happening is that God is pouring out his judgment upon a Christ-directing world. But he’s also a time where God is showing not just judgment, but mercy and grace, and he’s desiring to see the gospel continue to go out and to see people saved and people will be saved. I believe there’s going to be a huge harvest of souls in the tribulation period because there’ll be people that are seeing what’s going on and looking at Jesus as their only hope, and that’s what he is for us all.

Andrew Marcus:

Well, Pastor Brent Smith, thank you so much for joining us today.

Brent Smith:

Hey, thanks for having me. It’s been awesome.

Andrew Marcus:

Hey, thanks so much for joining us today. For more great content, check out THE INDOUBT SHOW on YouTube, Spotify, Apple Music, or wherever you stream your podcast. We hope you enjoyed it today. Feel free to check out indoubt.ca. We have some great resources available to you. Have an awesome day.

Hey, INDOUBT Audio World, we got a fantastic resource for the month of May. Creation’s Awesome Critters, Laugh Again and host Phil Callaway does it again. A fantastic resource especially for young families. Lots of cool questions, talking about different animals and how it connects to God’s beautiful story. It’s a wonderful resource that you will love. So you can go to indoubt.ca. There’s a free promo code. Enjoy it for the month of May for free. God bless you guys.

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Rapture-Real-Fake-Theology-Eschatology-End-Times

Who's Our Guest?

Brent Smith

Brent Smith is the lead pastor of Riverside Calvary Chapel, a church he planted in 2002 in Langley, British Columbia. He’s been in full time pastoral ministry since 1995 and has had the joy of being a part of church plants locally and internationally. He has a heart for people to be equipped through the Word and going forth with the gospel. Brent and his wife Michelle have 4 children (2 of them married) and one grandson.
Rapture-Real-Fake-Theology-Eschatology-End-Times

Who's Our Guest?

Brent Smith

Brent Smith is the lead pastor of Riverside Calvary Chapel, a church he planted in 2002 in Langley, British Columbia. He’s been in full time pastoral ministry since 1995 and has had the joy of being a part of church plants locally and internationally. He has a heart for people to be equipped through the Word and going forth with the gospel. Brent and his wife Michelle have 4 children (2 of them married) and one grandson.